Publisher:
Tellwell Talent

Publication Date:
12/31/2020

Copyright Date:
N/A

ISBN:
978-0-2288-3799-2

Binding:
Paperback

U.S. SRP:
25.00

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SORCERERS REBORN: Earth

By Richard B.

IR_Star-black
IR Rating:
2.5
With the solid backstory of a war among sorcerers and the intriguing methodology of magic, the sequels to SORCERERS REBORN: Earth may be more engaging than the first if they develop more distinct personalities within the characters.

Richard B.’s novel SORCERERS REBORN: Earth blends the science fiction and fantasy genres to lay the foundation for a book series about extraterrestrial sorcerers. The story begins with an old man named DeWayne who takes in a strange lost black cat. The cat, named Midnight, communicates with DeWayne telepathically to tell him she comes from a planet called Orighen where a war between sorcerers has been raging for centuries. In a battle, six sorcerers were killed, but before their deaths, Midnight took and stored their powers, then came to Earth and distributed the power among six individuals, including DeWayne, who possesses the magic of their leader. With his newfound powers of telekinesis and shape-shifting, among others, DeWayne changes his appearance and name, becoming a young man named Jason, and he begins to seek out the other sorcerers so that he may awaken their powers and develop a plan to return to Orighen and defeat the enemy. Jason/DeWayne and the other sorcerers have dreams of their former selves on Orighen, detailed in the book, that show the great battles they fought there.

While Midnight only gives the gift of sorcery to six individuals, a few pairs come to Jason. There are two sets of twins, one of each of whom receive the gift, but they all become magical. The connection of twins makes sense, but why a husband and wife pair share the gift is unclear, and the purpose for having additional sorcerers is never stated. While the book starts with DeWayne and adds characters as the story progresses, the cast, all living in the same house, soon balloons to fifteen sorcerers and the extra characters create clutter. Despite the crowdedness, Author Richard B. writes scenes that feature six or more characters at once while succeeding in keeping track of where each person is and what they are doing in a compelling manner. Fight scenes in the dream sequences, where several sorcerers at a time are wielding magic against an enemy, are fully choreographed, exciting, and absorbing.

Concerning the backstories of the human characters, the two sets of twins’ parents had both died in similar ways; both sets of twins feel as though they need a new start because their home has too many bad memories. When they decide to go to Jason’s house, they follow the same thought process and exchange similar dialogue. This makes reading about their experiences feel repetitive, and the individual characters lack distinct personalities. When any three sorcerer characters are discussing logistics for plans, they could be exchanged for any other three. Dialogue is contrived and, alongside exposition, leans toward telling rather than showing, especially when the characters are learning about their powers and making plans for short adventures.

With the solid backstory of a war among sorcerers and the intriguing methodology of magic, the sequels to SORCERERS REBORN: Earth may be more engaging than the first if they develop more distinct personalities within the characters.

~Aimee Jodoin for IndieReader