Angelic forces versus the demonic attacks of a fantastical world in: SERVANT OF FIRE

Verdict: A high fantasy epic chronicling the rise of a great power, SERVANT OF FIRE is superbly written with a slow-building story perfect for getting lost in.

IR Rating

 
 

5.0

IR Rating

Intense world building results in a unique high fantasy epic following Korfax as he studies, masters, and becomes a major player in SERVANT OF FIRE.

Volume One of the Land of the First Trilogy, SERVANT OF FIRE, begins in what appears to be modern times following Helen MacLeod as she yearns for something more out of her lackluster life. Enter a god-like being with immense power scouring the earth for something—or someone. Angelic and otherworldly, Korfax seeks out Helen, for reasons unknown. Helen, and the readers, are drawn back into time to the Land of the First, the ethereal world of the Ell. Korfax unfolds his past for Helen to witness and understand. Korfax possesses the ability, like most Ell, to harness the power of Creation or “magic.” Born to a long line of guardians, he journeys to a university to learn how to properly wield this strange ability. A series of horrific demon attacks shatter the peace and reveal Korfax’s destiny.

SERVANT OF FIRE’s biggest attraction is the world building. Cambridge devotes the bulk of the story to crafting a fully realized world complete with unusual language and vibrant culture. The almost Tolkein-esque attention to detail rewards patience as the hefty story unfurls and blooms. Korfax is a tragic hero born in uncertain times. He masters magic without understanding his true place in the world. His journey is a long and interesting 0ne that serves to explain this strange new world while slowly building Korfax from the ground up. Cambridge’s writing is highly polished and deeply engaging with dynamic characters, decent dialogue, and incredible world-building. The land of the Ell and Korfax’s story is fascinating, boding well for the rest of the Land of the First trilogy.

A high fantasy epic chronicling the rise of a great power, SERVANT OF FIRE is superbly written with a slow-building story perfect for getting lost in.

~ IndieReader