Publisher:
Tellwell Talent

Publication Date:
07/11/2020

Copyright Date:
N/A

ISBN:
978-0-2288-2640-8

Binding:
Paperback

U.S. SRP:
17.99

THE KING WHO WOULD BE MAN

By Brian Plank

IR_Star-black
IR Rating:
3.0
The underlying message in Brian Plank's THE KING WHO WOULD BE MAN is powerful: sheep should probably stop trusting that shepherds ever have their best interests at heart. But while perversions of government, corporate greed, and narcissistic personalities are touched upon, the full scope of forces which may be at play remains underdeveloped.
Synopsis:

In a novel that reads like a memoir, THE KING WHO WOULD BE MAN by Brian Plank attempts to shine light on the troubled predicaments today's misfits, rule-breakers, and those of above-average IQ may find themselves in as round pegs trapped by square holes who become 'crazy' -- and perhaps have to be -- in order to help society's outward insanity evolve.

THE KING WHO WOULD BE MAN by Brian Plank is an ambitious, if somewhat uneven undertaking. While parts of the book are much too graphically violent to appeal to most readers interested in ‘spirituality/inspiration’ — as this title is categorized — on the whole, plenty of what’s explored is a fascinating character study into the descent towards madness. In minute detail, the story begins by following the main character’s trajectory as a modern-day student, working on building a career as a talented corporate employee, along with the ins and outs of his social life. Though there are bright spots, in many ways this fellow’s course is actually one of steady decline towards paranoia and homelessness, though he’s been told he’s a genius. Since it is a common nightmare of many an upstanding, educated citizen during these turbulent, riotous times that one might somehow go from having an impressive resume, a loving family, and money in the bank to becoming one of the ever-growing number of the desperate and destitute who live on the streets dispossessed of all they’d once held dear, this cautionary tale is likely to attract an audience of all those determined to avoid that kind of fate.

The book begins on a strong note, outlining how different life is for the narrator in his urban homeless hell, now that the green lawns and trees of his youth no longer exist and skies are streaked with chemtrails. Having voices in his head traditionally labeled ‘schizophrenic’ may be the organic condition he’s developed. Or, as thousands if not millions of individuals attest, evil mystery voices in one’s head may instead be the outcome of something even more nefarious than mental illness, such as entity possession, nonconsensual experimentation with voice-to-skull technology, or some other form of intentional targeting aimed at discrediting/’disappearing’ inconvenient truth-tellers/whistleblowers, as briefly alluded to. While the plot runs long, much of the included workplace drama and baby-mama turmoil is somewhat repetitive and could be condensed, leaving room for a fuller exploration of the ‘dark forces’ that are hinted at without being adequately developed, which would make for a sounder, more well-constructed book.

The underlying message in Brian Plank’s THE KING WHO WOULD BE MAN is powerful: sheep should probably stop trusting that shepherds ever have their best interests at heart. But while perversions of government, corporate greed, and narcissistic personalities are touched upon, the full scope of forces which may be at play remains underdeveloped.

~C.S. Holmes for IndieReader