INDIGO DOVES

by Marie Masters

Verdict: INDIGO DOVES by Marie Masters is a fascinating read, encompassing history, mystery, cognitively differently-abled characters, intertwining timelines, and karma coming home to roost.

IR Rating

 
 

3.8

IR Rating

INDIGO DOVES by Marie Masters begins as Jacob, a driven young real estate flipper, hits Marinda with his car after viewing a potential house. Maybe Marinda–in her twenties, though she still seems in many ways a child–wasn’t looking where she was going, but the local judge has little sympathy for a driver involved in an accident with a pedestrian in a crosswalk. Unrepentant, brash, disparaging of country bumpkin-ness and locales, Jacob winds up putting his foot into his mouth enough times to have his sentence changed from a fine with community service to entirely having to purchase and renovate the old house he’d come to town to view. And that’s where the fun begins.

While chapter titles could use improvement (from the on-the-nose “Splat!” that opens the novel, “Gavel” when Jacob goes to court, etc.), it is interesting to watch Jacob and Marinda form a special connection via the remote viewing into the old building’s past. While Miss Confer, who previously owned the property, welcomed visits from Marinda as they happily sipped tea and spent time psychically exploring the building’s fascinating cast of historical characters, all 28-year-old Jacob Bildburg wants to do is fix up the old place and sell it, washing his hands of the whole mess once and for all. Little by little, however, the mysteries surrounding this location, once frequented and later owned by a woman named Cadie McClelland–the Songbird of the Theater Baud-E-Lair–entice him to  research the happenings around 1862 and towards developing an ability to genuinely care, a quality sorely missing from Jacob’s life as careless capitalist and a gregarious, acerbic womanizer.

As young Marinda and historical Cadie McClelland begin to infuse Jacob’s world with a different sensibility, he changes from the type of person once viewed as “no better than a python biding its time and examining its next meal from a distance to keep the element of surprise in his attack” to someone who–while still brash–can think about and care for things other than himself. Aspects of the novel, such as the factually accurate creation of a National Road intended to service America’s growing population heading ever west, could be further developed with added complexity and depth, but overall INDIGO DOVES by Marie Masters is a journey worth taking.

INDIGO DOVES by Marie Masters is a fascinating read, encompassing history, mystery, cognitively differently-abled characters, intertwining timelines, and karma coming home to roost.

~Cristina Salat for IndieReader

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