GRAFFITI CREEK

by Matt Coleman

Verdict: GRAFFITI CREEK is stuffed to the covers with action, energy, and daring chase scenes - and also manages to demonstrate a good bit of heart along with its adrenaline.

IR Rating

 
 

3.5

IR Rating

What seems to be a routine traffic stop spirals out of control for Cary Trubody, caught in a murderous web of lies, police brutality, and corruption.

Cary Trubody and her girlfriend Johnna were returning home from a party when they were stopped by police for running a red light. But what appeared to be a routine traffic stop ends in violence, brutality, and Cary running for her life. She finds help from unexpected and seemingly random places and passers-by – but also finds herself more deeply embroiled in a bizarre police vendetta that has already taken or threatened a number of lives, and may end hers. As more bodies are uncovered – real and metaphorical – she has to figure out quickly what her pursuers are after, and whom she can trust. But can she do all that, and turn the tables on her hunters, before she ends up as one more voiceless, anonymous corpse down by GRAFFITI CREEK?

GRAFFITI CREEK is an action-based mystery, full of enough adrenaline-fueled chases, nail-biting close calls, and clever twists and turns to make it very difficult to put down once you’ve started. There’s very little break in the action, in fact, which makes it rather impressive that we do get to know Cary and a number of the other characters quite well. There’s a tendency for a book of this type to fall into the trap of simply becoming a series of interconnected chase scenes with more adrenaline than plot, and occasionally this one succumbs, but Coleman does a reasonable job of giving both plot and characters a solid context and clear direction overall. He is quite good at conveying a lot about his characters through mannerisms, dialogue, and actions, without needing a great deal of plot-clogging backstory or explanation.

Cary’s quick-thinking cleverness and ability to stay one step ahead of everybody else – both enemy and ally – make her a thoroughly enjoyable heroine. Snappy dialogue adds a touch of wry humor that brightens the book, but the author never lets you forget that the missing people are human beings, dear to and sought anxiously by their loved ones. The book could use a bit of editing, especially near the end – there are just a couple of places where the grammar and phrasing suffer a bit. For example, the beginning of Chapter 37: “Marlowe and Shelley neither one owned a key to Dante’s apartment.”

GRAFFITI CREEK is stuffed to the covers with action, energy, and daring chase scenes – and also manages to demonstrate a good bit of heart along with its adrenaline.

~Catherine Langrehr for IndieReader

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