IT IS MYSELF THAT I REMAKE

by Jaclyn Maria Fowler

Verdict: IT IS MYSELF THAT I REMAKE is a whimsical romance with some unique plot twists and premises. The story is sweet and tender at its heart, a journey of love and intimacy, even in the face of tragedy and loss.

IR Rating

 
 

2.0

IR Rating

Sophie was an unusual child, who never learned to doubt that her spirit guide’s voice was real. And as she got older, it became clear that that spirit guide was in fact the great Irish poet, William B. Yeats. Encouraged by her eccentric Irish-American parents, she absorbed his poetry with enthusiasm, and desperately wanted him to appear to her physically. However, the double tragedy of her mother’s death in a car accident, and her own rape and near-murder, leave her reeling and damaged. Love and healing seem a distant possibility – until she finds Yeats, alive again, re-embodied as her guide, counselor…and lover. But every happiness has its end, and Sophie is terrified of the day that her beloved will disappear again, to return to the spirit world. Is there room in her life for one more miracle?

IT IS MYSELF THAT I REMAKE is a whimsical romance with some unique plot twists and premises. The story is sweet and tender at its heart, a journey of love and intimacy, even in the face of tragedy and loss. Sophie is a lively and sympathetic heroine, who survives some terrible events with resilience and emotional courage. Fowler clearly has a deep and profound belief in the spirit world and the guidance that it can offer, which will appeal to those who share that belief. However, much of the book reads as a spiritual/religious lecture rather than a story. The emotions feel flat, more explained than demonstrated – “Sophie gave Willie the gift of recognizing love as both physical and spiritual, the transcendence of it not requiring transcendence at all, but simply acceptance”.

Characters spend an awful lot of time analyzing their emotions and reflecting on the deeper meaning of their feelings, which is good at conveying the spiritual lessons the author wants to teach, but not so good at helping the reader to actually feel the emotions with them. Even the tragic events that happen to the characters – Sophie’s mother’s death and her rape – feel rather arbitrary, as if they were simply thrown into the book willy-nilly to give the characters obstacles to overcome later. Additionally, while it was probably a wise choice for the author to avoid using much Irish dialect, it then becomes jarring to have both Yeats and Sophie’s father overuse the interjection “Jaysus” at regular intervals.

~Catherine Langrehr for IndieReader