Notes from the Book of Faces

by Anar Azimov

Verdict: Azimov admits that these selections are merely basic observations of his surroundings. With that in mind, readers can take it at face (or face-less) value. He introduces you to a moment in a day. How that matters in your own world is entirely up to you.

IR Rating

 
 

2.0

IR Rating

In this book, Azimov welcomes readers into a smattering of simple observations of the world around him.  From a cancelled rock concert to the surprisingly intricate process of a U-turn, Azimov breaks down the often unnoticed dances of ordinary life into chunky beats.

Although the prevailing theme tweaks with an urban atmosphere, it is his observances of nature’s relationship (albeit conflicted at times) with man’s interference that creates the most effective pieces.

From Scraping The Sky,

The mirror surface swallows the sky, clouds, and birds flying by. The wall stops suddenly as a theatre prop: no rooms behind, no lifts. . . just the sky, clouds and birds, again.

The collection is called, NOTES FROM BOOK OF FACES, yet no faces appear within the

content. No people, no voices, no personal interaction. And that lack of predominant human versus environment inter-relatedness creates a void. It eliminates the very reason one should call attention to something in the first place.

The exploration of random observations of our urban environment has enjoyed an enduring appeal. This notion of answering the question, “Why should I care?” often brings about unique perspectives. However, don’t be fooled. The challenge of creating meaning from unexplored moments is often an underestimated adventure.

It requires an investment in feeling for something that often goes unnoticed as well as a tremendous command of visual language. A poet who nails it convinces the reader that this non-experience is the most fascinating thing going right now. Azimov opted to skip the human element, yet his work stills requires a relationship. It doesn’t need to be lasting or meaningful or a prolonged amount of time, but it needs to feel—something.

Azimov comes close in his selection titled, Useless Secrets.

Two escalators going up – a false race.

It’s not often one happens on to both escalators going in the same direction; one set is often going the opposite of its neighbor. Nevertheless the humanization of something that typically acts as a vehicle for the human race provides a thoughtful conflict.

Azimov admits that these selections are merely basic observations of his surroundings. With that in mind, readers can take it at face (or face-less) value. He introduces you to a moment in a day. How that matters in your own world is entirely up to you.

~IndieReader.

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