Ralph Pincus

by Marcus Lambert

Verdict: Despite some disjointedness that makes for difficult reading, RALPH PINCUS offers some bright spots through its dialogue.

IR Rating

 
 

1.0

IR Rating

RALPH PINCUS introduces a unique lead character to the literary scene – an average Jewish thirty-something who teams up with a sorcerer and vampire to vanquish evil. They meet a crazy cast of characters along the way (including a gay unicorn and a homicidal kiddie clown) as they fight the forces that be to prevent an occult takeover. While author Marcus Lambert has an intense imagination, the novel is often hard to follow, jumping between narrators and time periods.

The book starts out with a note from the author basically warning away any prudes or those with weak stomachs. Indeed, RALPH PINCUS does not shy away from gratuitous violence and sex (tons of it). One of the downsides of the story is the frequent sex scenes (which often have nothing to do with the actual plot). The graphic killing of zombies and murderers makes a tad more sense in the overall scheme of the book, but as the foreword suggested, any one squeamish will find the novel hard to get through.

Lambert is a talented writer of dialogue – each character has a distinctive voice which helps bring their personas to life. However, the reader is often taken out of the story with entire scenes that don’t fit with the flow of the plot. The general feel of the novel tends towards the explicit, and readers can end up feeling turned off by the anecdotes in RALPH PINCUS that seem like they’re just added to insert some grit to the story. Those looking for a linear plot with likable characters will be disappointed.

The length of the book is perfect – not too long for those that can’t stomach the erratic and over-the-top sensibilities. For his next book, Lambert might consider a stronger editor who can cut out extraneous parts and enhance the sense of humor that is already there in his writing.

Despite some disjointedness that makes for difficult reading, RALPH PINCUS offers some bright spots through its dialogue.

Reviewed by Erin Konrad for IndieReader

1 reply
  1. Marcus Lambert
    Marcus Lambert says:

    I’ve received bad reviews before, and I expect many in the future. A grim satire about media celebrations of masculinity and male sexuality infused with a slapstick horror comedy about a Jewish guy saving Christmas is topping out at niche.

    Because of this, I’ve never felt compelled to actually comment on any of the reviews I’ve received. I also know that commenting on negative reviews will only make me sound like an embittered whiner. But I don’t mind negative reviews. A negative review for my book can actually be more helpful in finding readers than a positive one.

    My problem with the review, and IndieReader as a whole, is the lack of professionalism. For those that may not know, IndieReader is a paid review service for self-published authors. Authors are allowed to use any part of the review once its posted as long as IndieReader is credited as the source.

    I paid for this review fully prepared for a negative one. I assumed any review I received from this service would contain useful tidbits I could cull for marketing . I was wrong. The review I got back was flat and required me to copyedit it before I felt comfortable with it being posted. Both of the changes I made to the review had nothing to do with the reviewer’s understanding of the text and everything to do with how carelessly the actual review was written. That was not something I expected from a professional review writing service.

    I brought this frustration up multiple times through email exchanges with IndieReader. They concluded I was disgruntled and wished me the best. I concluded their definition of professional is as nebulous as their definition of copyedit.

    A double dose of Buyer Beware: Although a paid service, IndieReader isn’t particularly professional. And my book is full of sex and violence and other things that aren’t for most tastes.

    Reply

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