GOD, GRACE AND DUMB LUCK, a collection of short stories about life, love + the general shortcomings of life

by Phloyd Knucklez

Verdict: Mr. Knucklez’s intentions are good and the stories are headed in the right direction. Now if he can get them past the draft stage, then he could have something to work with.

IR Rating

 
 

2.3

IR Rating

The short story format has a clear goal: To entice the reader into fictional worlds with as much brevity as possible. But this doesn’t mean that the characters should be underdeveloped and the narrative plots completely ignored.

In GOD, GRACE AND DUMB LUCK, author Phloyd Knucklez tries his utmost to deliver a collection of short stories about life, love, desire and the general shortcomings of life itself. However, what Knucklez has spun here is a collection of vignettes, at best.

The stories are so short that by the time we are remotely interested in the characters or the tale, they’re already over. The first story, “Part of the Unraveling Process”, reads like a sort of stand-up comedy skit, except for the absence of humor or any kind of introspection. The narrator talks about not being necessary or useful to anyone, and that perhaps he is talking to wrong people. The premise is fantastic, and we expect a deep intellectual argument beyond that reasoning. But it never comes.

All of the included stories follow this strange pretense at being enticing, only to fall short in their delivery at the last minute. It’s not that the stories don’t have potential, but the author fails to connect to the reader, the story and—sometimes—to his own characters.

In “To Plunder and Misrepresent,” the narrator is an unemployed and unmotivated individual who is constantly interrogated by his family and friends about his search for a job. While simultaneously dodging the probing questions regarding his search for employment, he finds lonely spinsters to occasionally cook for him and offer him a place to stay, which he rejects. He goes on to discuss his job interviews, which he miserably bombs, and in the end we just feel like nothing happened. We feel cheated out of the story that never was and a little wary of the rest.

Mr. Knucklez’s intentions are good and the stories are headed in the right direction. Now if he can get them past the draft stage, then he could have something to work with.

~Adriana Delgado for IndieReader

  • billy jack gisher

    this author clearly is a pyscotic asshole.

  • Sinthia

    Ouch! What a review.

  • Emil Thorton

    I read this book. What the reviewer fails to understand is Knucklez is like an abstract painter. He challenges space, both negative and positive. Maybe she didn’t respond viscerally to the way he mixed the colors or left certain areas of the canvas totally blank or did not appreciate the Star of David tattoo he put on Jesus’ uncircumcised penis… whatever… art, like trash, is completely negotiable and constantly subject to debate. Very much like our current presidential campaign. Politics aside, this book made me laugh and think and was a refreshing alternative to the the crap they force-feed us on TV and the internet. Will Mr. Knucklez ever win the Nobel Prize in Literature? Very unlikely. But at least he gave me some things to think about…myself, life, the bitch I’m living with, the boss who sucks… Thanks Mr. Knucklez for your imagination. It’s helping me get through one more day of this bitch of a life.