A determined mother battles for her family’s safety in a futuristic world in: TITAN

Verdict: Short, but packed with intense concepts and thundering action, TITAN examines humanity through the lens of a philosophical scientist, determined mother, and the last bastion of civilization in the aftermath of the world’s collapse.

IR Rating

 
 

3.0

IR Rating

TITAN begins with an ominous poem/list of reasons why America fell and brought the rest of the world with her before rising as “Amerikka.” In this new world, humanity retreats to one city while the rest devolve into violence, cannibalism, and mutation. Paris, upon giving birth to the aptly named Second Son, leaves her husband Troy and their children behind to journey to the city of Aegmos and demand citizenship the only way she knows how, fast and swift violence. Meanwhile, Troy perfects his A.I. and cold fusion methods, which seem to be the solution to saving humanity from the continued effects of nuclear fallout.

While it is incredibly short, around 88 pages, TITAN excels at building an ominous tone and potentially setting off a series. SOLOMON, the A.I., is a relatively large character in the novella and is introduced when Troy repeatedly conducts the famous Turing Test. Foreshadowing aside, the slow evolution of SOLOMON offsets the violence found outside Aegmos and Paris’s attempt to break into the city. Paris and Troy’s attempts at survival perfectly encapsulate their personalities and unusual relationship: Paris bulls forward and lets the bodies stack up while Troy teaches his son and SOLOMON while methodically researching. TITAN posits a what-if scenario expounds on it delightfully as the story marches to its inevitable conclusion. A conclusion that reads like the prologue to a fantastic new series that delves into morality and ethics in an increasingly dehumanized world.

Short, but packed with intense concepts and thundering action, TITAN examines humanity through the lens of a philosophical scientist, determined mother, and the last bastion of civilization in the aftermath of the world’s collapse.

~John Murray for IndieReader.