Adopting a biblical understanding of fear as a way of life defines being a good Christian in SPIRITUAL FEAR FACTOR

by Tim Abraham

Verdict: SPIRITUAL FEAR FACTOR uses a surprising mix of humor and pop culture to encourage Christian readers to embrace fear of God over fear of man.

IR Rating

 
 

3.0

IR Rating

Set up as a three-part “classroom” concept (learning in the classroom, the lab of life, and for eternity), this work offers an in-depth look at fear.

After an introduction to the television series Fear Factor, the book launches into explanations about how the concept of fear has been misunderstood. We live in a world where fear is focused on other people, outside circumstances, or ourselves, when it should be in accordance to King Solomon’s words in Ecclesiastes 12:13: “Fear God and obey his commands, for that is everyone’s duty.”

Literal interpretations of the bible, scripture quotations, and frequent footnotes (sometimes humorous and self-deprecating) combine with a breezy writing style to cover the material, which can get heavy at times. For instance, the book says Satan’s influence over the snake in the Garden of Eden represents the first terrorist attack. In keeping with fundamental Christian beliefs, the book espouses that “Jesus is the truth, not personal happiness,” that “Christianity is the one and only religion that believes it is God who acts to save us,” and that happiness and perfect love await good Christians in the afterlife.

Fear in our culture is another aspect explored here. The author features lyrics of pop stars Pharrell Williams and Colbie Caillat as examples of performers who mean well, but miss the mark by focusing on personal happiness and/or fear of man, rather than a fear of God. This section also recounts a story about carrying literal and figurative stones of judgment, bitterness, or anger. Though these (and other) arguments in the book may reinforce Christian belief in fearing God, non-believers aren’t likely to be converted.

Despite the author’s professional writing style, the book could use a light edit to correct errors in grammar and syntax.

SPIRITUAL FEAR FACTOR uses a surprising mix of humor and pop culture to encourage Christian readers to embrace fear of God over fear of man.

~IndieReader