Julia G. Fox on “And Then There Were Three: Sixty-Seven Letters to Sasha”

IR Sticker IR ApprovedWhat is the name of the book and when was it published?

And Then There Were Three: Sixty-Seven Letters to Sasha, published in October of 2015.

What’s the book’s first line? 

“In the last scene of El Sexo de los Ángeles, a Spanish film about ménage à trois, a young couple…”

What’s the book about? Give us the “pitch”. 

When gay marriage was legalized in the United States on June 26, 2015, it appeared as though the last major hurdle for LGBT rights was finally overcome. While this is a major milestone in the journey for equal rights, there is still a long way to go before global tolerance can be achieved.

Julie Fox’s autobiographical memoir, And Then There Were Three: Sixty-Seven Letters to Sasha, documents the challenges that still face members of the LGBT community, especially those in countries where being homosexual is still considered an abnormality. In a moving collection of letters to the man who opened her eyes to a new perspective on love and tolerance, Fox gives readers an honest look into her experiences with a less traditional type of relationship. In this poetic memoir, Fox chronicles the reunion of her husband, George, with his former lover from college, Sasha—a man living a double life in a culture where his homosexuality could result in imprisonment or worse. As Sasha enters their life, both husband and wife must learn to navigate and explore the challenges and complexities of a polyamorous reality together against a backdrop of cultural and societal expectations and judgments.

And Then There Were Three: Sixty-Seven Letters to Sasha is a personal reflection that examines the dynamic and often challenging elements of marriage, relationships, and acceptance, as well as the nature of love itself.

What inspired you to write the book? A particular person? An event? 

Meeting with Sasha opened my eyes on the subject of LGBT rights across the world and moving in with Sasha gave me an intimate understanding of the workings of a polyamorous relationship.     

What’s the main reason someone should really read this book? 

A moving statement on the transcendence of love, And Then There Were Three: Sixty-Seven Letters to Sasha will introduce you to:

* The severe psychological repercussions of concealing one’s sexuality, such as being ostracized by the community, fearing shame and physical torture and imprisonment, and the dissociation from the gay population.

* The paths of life LGBT men and women choose in parts of the world where homosexuality is still considered an abnormality.

* Polyamory and what it means, as well as an intimate look into how these relationships function in day-to-day life.

* The dynamic and often challenging elements of marriage, relationships, and acceptance.