Music and steamy seductions in: THE SONG THAT SEDUCED PARIS (The Bel Homme Quartet: Book One)

Verdict: THE SONG THAT SEDUCED PARIS is an entertaining read with over-the-top plots, a swoon-worthy hero and plucky heroine.

IR Rating

 
 

3.0

IR Rating

Readers lamenting the loss of Jackie Collins, take heart: Cindy Irish’s Bel Homme Quartet is here to fill the void, beginning with the sizzling THE SONG THAT SEDUCED PARIS.

In the best Jacqueline Susann/Jackie Collins tradition of soapy plots revolving around superstars, THE SONG THAT SEDUCED PARIS is the first in a series of four books about a quartet of pop-opera singers, Bel Homme (Beautiful Man).

The book’s hero, Gabriel, is just that, a fantastically talented and hugely successful French singer whose boredom drives him to join Bel Homme, created by impresario Teddy Wilson and stage managed by Annie Morgan, an American music teacher still reeling from the death of her husband. As Annie and Teddy spend a summer together, a forbidden romance sparks between Annie and Gabriel.

THE SONG THAT SEDUCED PARIS’ title should be a dead giveaway, but if not, be warned that this is steamy romance. The book begins with a graphic sex scene and goes from there, taking readers on a glamorous and yes, seductive ride. But there’s such a thing as too much of a good thing, and Irish’s reliance on sex to further the plot borders on becoming more wearisome than sensual.

Too much of a good thing, in fact, sums up THE SONG THAT SEDUCED PARIS’ biggest flaw — the book is just too long. Scenes go on for too long, dialogue gets repetitive, and plot points and even character traits are worn to a nub by constant reiteration. As it is, the book is good; with some judicious editing, it could stand beside any of Jackie Collins’ series entries.

THE SONG THAT SEDUCED PARIS is an entertaining read with over-the-top plots, a swoon-worthy hero and plucky heroine.

~IndieReader.