Spirituality 101

by Ivan Figueroa-Otero, M.D.

Verdict: If SPIRITUALITY 101 does not completely demystify the nature of man’s spiritual journey, it’s nevertheless an interesting read.

IR Rating

 
 

3.0

IR Rating

Constructed like a self-help book-cum-self-directed study complete with glossary and homework assignments, Ivan Figueroa-Otero M.D.’s SPIRITUALITY 101: For Dropouts of the School of Life is an entertaining trip towards enlightenment that attempts to demystify man’s place in relation to the universe and yes, a higher power.

Figueroa-Otero makes it clear in the opening chapters of SPIRITUALITY 101 that his is not a book about God or even religion, per se, but rather a guided path that will help the reader to understand and harness his own spirituality. By the end of the book, Figueroa-Otero writes, he hopes that readers will have their own answers to “life’s archetypal questions: Who am I? Where do I come from? Where do I go from here?”

Though Figueroa-Otero references many religions, Christianity and Buddhism among them, SPIRITUALITY 101 is non-denominational, and approaches spirituality from a unique and scientific perspective. As “our bodies are made of up to 95% subatomic particles that are outside of time,” theorizes Figueroa-Otero,  part of each of us — e.g. our spirits — is invisible, out of time and immortal. It’s what we do with that subatomic material that makes our lives important, and each chapter in the book is designed to bring readers nearer to their spiritual selves by developing a deeper understanding of what stands between humans and their spiritual selves.

Figueroa-Otero may not have complete mastery over his subject, and sometimes ventures off into tangents that add little to the narrative (or make little sense, such as his comparing selfish human behavior to Ricky Martin’s song “Living La Vida Loca”), but he’s an engaging writer whose interest in his subject makes it interesting to readers.

If SPIRITUALITY 101 does not completely demystify the nature of man’s spiritual journey, it’s nevertheless an interesting read.

Reviewed by J.E. Cornett for IndieReader