Addison’s Mark

by Matt Kuvakos

Verdict: ADDISON'S MARK is a lively and imaginative book, full of drama and vividly-portrayed scenes, aimed at a Christian audience but accessible to readers of all religions.

IR Rating

 
 

3.0

IR Rating

A cynical young man with bizarre visions finds himself caught up in the struggle between Good and Evil when he’s hired for the presidential campaign of his new girlfriend’s father.

Sam Addison lost his father to a terrorist attack, and watched his mother lose herself to visions of beings only she could see. In the outside world, the economy crashed to the point where there are almost no functioning businesses left. However, when Ashlin Ammon, adopted daughter of prominent Senator and presidential candidate Marcus Ammon, enters his life, she brings with her a spark of happiness and hope. Quickly, the young couple fall in love, and Ashlin’s father hires Sam to help as an assistant on his presidential campaign. But Sam develops an odd scar, and strange visions that seem to involve him in a dramatic battle between powerful beings, angelic and demonic. Does he have a greater destiny? And where do Senator Ammon and Ashlin fit into that destiny?

ADDISON’S MARK is a dramatic tale of a young man caught up in the struggle between God and the Devil, with vigorous action and suspenseful choices waiting to be made. Sam is a sympathetic and warmhearted guy. His doubts are easy to understand given his history, but he obviously wants, underneath his cynical shell, to believe in something worth fighting for. His love affair with Ashlin is charming, and the pair of them, both survivors of rather emotionally-strained childhoods, find a touching warmth in each other. The author’s use of symbolism, dreams, and art adds color and texture to the story, and Sam’s visions are vividly compelling.

Kuvakos promises more books to come, and this is obviously only the beginning of the story, as there is a lot of action but not much explanation yet. The story hints at a great deal which hopefully will be made clearer in later books. There are a couple of things in the book that strain belief a bit – the idea, for example, that a presidential candidate could keep his daughter as far out of the public eye as Sen. Ammon keeps Ashlin, or the attempted tampering with the sound systems at the debate, which would, in real life, more likely be quickly discovered and as quickly fixed, with no effect other than to tarnish the Senator’s reputation if his personnel were caught in the act. Also, there are a few misused words and errors: “grinded” for “ground,” or “hieroglyphic” for “hieroglyph,” for example, or the assertion that the ankh symbol is “somewhat linked to Islamic culture” when it is a non-Islamic symbol from the polytheistic ancient Egyptian religion.

ADDISON’S MARK is a lively and imaginative book, full of drama and vividly-portrayed scenes, aimed at a Christian audience but accessible to readers of all religions.

Reviewed by Catherine Langrehr for IndieReader