Fractured

Verdict: FRACTURED is a humorous commentary on modern relationships and romance. It's a sweet, slightly sardonic look at bad relationship choices and why we make them.

IR Rating

 
 

3.5

IR Rating

A short collection of essays on friendship, love and relationships, by a woman who is, in her own words, “attracted to men who are emotionally stunted.”

Author, K.J. Pierce introduces her work by saying, “What good was it for me to examine other people’s lives and motivations without examining my own?” This book is an effort to correct that, by looking into some of her own bad and good choices in romance and friendship, in the form of essays interspersed with small near-poetic paragraphs describing past relationships, titled “Of Frogs and Princes.”

The author is not unkind, even to men who weren’t kind to her, and her writing has the wry and affectionate tone of one looking back on youthful folly, with some regret but no bitterness. Pierce willingly takes responsibility for her own choices, and seeks to examine them to find lessons from them, rather than people to blame. Her writing can be cryptic at times, but is always poetic and evocative – she has a gift for expressing the emotional heart of a matter in a few words. Pierce is willing to laugh at herself, especially in the final essay, “Ten Steps for Befriending a Rockstar: or The Gentle Art of Stalking.”

There are times Pierce can get a bit melodramatic, particularly in the short interspersed segments. This is perhaps due to the need to capture readers’ attention in a short space, but sometimes it falls flat, as when she says, in Part Thirteen, “For the first time in her adult life, she felt safe and cared for. Right before she nearly succumbed to gouging her heart out with a spoon.” Any book that focuses entirely upon the author’s love life risks becoming tedious at points – Pierce wisely, however, keeps the book short, which helps to offset that tendency.

FRACTURED is a humorous commentary on modern relationships and romance. It’s a sweet, slightly sardonic look at bad relationship choices and why we make them.

Reviewed by Catherine Langrehr for IndieReader