Murder Has Consequences

by Giacomo Giammatteo

Verdict: MURDER HAS CONSEQUENCES is a violent thriller, but has a seamless feel that makes it a smooth and addictive read.

IR Rating

 
 

4.5

IR Rating

MURDER HAS CONSEQUENCES is a story of two childhood friends with a history of violence that reunite in tragedy after very divergent life choices. They, and everyone close to them, learn that sometimes even righteous actions taken in the name of friendship, family and true redemption have dire and unknowable consequences. It changes from first to third person, the breaks explained in the beginning by Giammatteo and marked clearly. There are two whole, but interconnected stories, linked by the first protagonist, Frankie Donovan.

Donovan is a respected New York cop drawn home to Delaware by a family tragedy. As the situation there explodes and he becomes a murder suspect, he reunites with the second leading man, his best friend and recently released from prison Nicky Fusco. Their friendship has been tumultuous and complicated, but it lies unquestioned in this time of need. When Frankie must leave to return to his partner in New York and the search for a demented serial killer, Nicky continues the investigation at home to vindicate both himself and Frankie in local crimes that could put him back into jail for life.

The complexity of the men’s relationships with each other and the people close to them is front and center, in contrast with the psychopath on a murderous rampage in New York. The killer’s heinous and random crimes go far beyond any crisis of conscience or lamentable morality in Nicky’s story or Frankie’s past. Their hometown brand of violent justice pales in comparison. Both leading men are so self-aware and conflicted, the fact that they are questionable as heroes becomes insignificant.

There were a couple glitches in the plot that seemed obvious, but none hindered the complete narrative or progression of either story.

MURDER HAS CONSEQUENCES (Book 2 in the Friendship and Honor series) is a violent thriller, but has a seamless feel that makes it a smooth and addictive read.

Reviewed by Kat Toland for IndieReader.