Nov 26, 2014
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7 Great Books to Read Whilst You Occupy Wall Street

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Occupy Wall Street, a “Movement For Economic Justice”, began on September 17th when–following a rally Lower Manhattan–an estimated 150 people began an encampment in Zuccotti Park.

Homepage Feature, Homepage Sub  •  Oct 18, 2011

Occupy Wall Street, a “Movement For Economic Justice”, began on September 17th when–following a rally Lower Manhattan–an estimated 150 people began an encampment in Zuccotti Park.

Since then, the movement has spread world wide–from U.S. cities including Denver, Omaha and Philadelphia to North and South America, Asia, Africa and Europe, with over 1,500 events in 82 countries.

While the OWS participants have already set up a free lending Library and created a self-published newspaper–the Occupied Wall Street Journal–we thought we’d contribute to the movement by suggesting some great indie titles to fill the time between demonstrating and getting doused with pepper spray.  Like the OWSJ, all of the books are self-published and speak to the power of the individual.

To those of you who have been there from the start, and for those who are just joining in, you have our support and thanks.  This list is for you!

1. MISFITS & HEROES

by  Kathleen Rollins

Haunting personal stories of love, grief, and acceptance intertwined with the history of Africa and Western exploration.  A lush voyage from the coast of Africa, all the way to the Gulf of Mexico.

2. JUSTICE IN AMERICA

How it Works – How it Fails

by Russell F. Moran

The goddess of justice is blind and deaf, and very often dumb, according to this savvy critique of the American legal system.  A lively, brash, illuminating insider’s look at the law, by a compelling expert witness. (Kirkus Reviews)

3. PARTS NORTH

by Kevin Cohen

Rural atmosphere, dry humor, detailed description, and characters that seem glued together from wood chips. The conflict centers on a safe cracker who was imprisoned for years and his grown son who lost an arm racing against a young man who is now a town cop.

4. LIBERTY IN AMERICA’S FOUNDING MOMENT

Doubts About Natural Rights in Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence

by Howard I. Schwartz

This balanced scholarly investigation of the Founding Fathers’ divergent notions of inherent freedoms–in historical and contemporary terms–is sure to confound those who think they learned everything they need to know in 9th-grade civics. (Kirkus Reviews)

5. RETERNITY

by Neal Wooten

Wooten’s novel is an earnest coming-of-age tale as well as an inventive look at the contested borderland between science and faith. (Kirkus Reviews)

6. THEY COOKED THE BOOKS

A Humorous Look at the World of White-Collar Crime


Have you ever wondered about expressions such as “The cat’s out of the bag,” “Fast-buck artist,” and “On the Q.T.?” Patrick Edwards explores these sayings and their fascinating origins, original meanings and present day usage having to do with Wall Street crime and Ponzi schemes.

7. OH, BEAUTIFUL

An American Family in the 20th Century

by John Paul Godges

Godges presents a vast narrative depicting what it means to be an American, told through the lens of an expressive family story.  A satisfying, well-crafted reminder of how one family’s story can encapsulate the cultural history of America as a whole. (Kirkus Reviews)

  • Jim Crigler

    Might I also suggest Basic Economics?

  • http://magicianofoz.blogspot.com/ James C. Wallace II

    I must confess that I’m deeply disappointed that Magician of Oz, Shadow Demon of Oz and Family of Oz were not mentioned as a great read during those long boring hours of protest. I think you’ve done those folks a disservice by not bringing to their attention some fine fantasy books where a young man overcomes great difficulties in the service of Princess Ozma and all that is good in the world. A positive role model goes a long ways nowadays!!!

  • http://www.reternitybook.com Neal Wooten

    What an awesome article and I am honored to have my book mentioned. It had never crossed my mind to consider the tedious hours these brave souls are enduring. You inspired me. I found this address to donate books for this purpose so I sent them four cases today. Here’s the address if anyone wants to donate books.

    Occupy Wall Street Library
    c/o UPS STORE
    118A Fulton St. #205
    NY, NY 10038

    • Amy Edelman

      Wow Neal…that’s so great! I’m heading down on Friday with my daughter to meet with the guys who are turning out the “Occupy Wall Street Journal”! Viva la indie!

  • http://misfitsandheroes.wordpress.com Kathleen Rollins

    Thanks so much for including Misfits and Heroes in your suggested reading list! I’m honored to be part of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

  • Nyc Trucido Press

    Lust Demented would fit well on this list – A declaration of war on the big publishing houses of New York City and the world – a supernatural noir for kindle -

    Lust Demented

  • http://www.johnpaulgodges.com John Paul Godges

    I’m honored to have Oh, Beautiful placed among such great company as well. Thanks to Amy for pulling this all together. And I love Neal’s suggestion to donate some books to the cause. Will do!

    • Amy Edelman

      Thanks! And we’re honored to have you!

  • Swift Loris

    “Whilst”?? Is there something about occupying Wall Street that turns one into a Brit? Or is it reading indie books that does it?

    • Amy Edelman

      A little bit of both.

  • Brett Straniere

    Dogs have angels too is also a great read.